Home  |  About Us  |  Site Map  |  Level One  |  Level Two  |  Level Three  |  Coping & Family Life  |  Away From Home  |  Forms  |  Finances
 
 

Splitting a Split Bolus

As background for this article, we recommend that you first read: Advanced Pump Feature #3: Split Bolus

A note about terminology (which varies between different pump manufacturers):
 In this article...
  • We use the term "Split Bolus" to refer to what Accu-Chek calls a Multiwave Bolus, Animas calls a Combo Bolus, Medtronic calls a Dual-Wave Bolus, and Omnipod calls an Extended Bolus. In a Split Bolus, some of the bolus is delivered upfront as a normal bolus, while some portion of the bolus is spread out over a period of time.
  • We use the term "Normal Bolus" (as this is what most pump companies call it) to refer to what Omnipod, Animas, and Medtronic call a Normal Bolus, and Accu-Chek calls a Standard Bolus, in which the entire dose is delivered immediately (upfront) with no extended portion.
  • We use the term "Extended Bolus" (as this is what most pump companies call it) to refer to what Animas, Omnipod and Accu-Chek call an Extended Bolus, and Medtronic calls a Square Wave Bolus, in which some or all of the insulin dose is spread out over a specified period of time.

In the Waltzing the Dragon article "Advanced Pump Features", we talked about the Split Bolus.

Remember!
In a Split Bolus, a portion of the total bolus is delivered upfront, as a normal bolus, while the rest is delivered over a specified period of time as an extended bolus.

This feature is easily accessed via the menus and buttons on your child's pump (check your owner's manual for specific instructions)... IF your child eats the planned amount of carbs.

But what if you expected him to eat two slices of pizza and he actually eats four? Your child's pump will not allow you to activate a second split bolus alongside the first. To further complicate things, some of the bolus has been delivered, but there is still a remaining extended portion to be delivered that will be lost if you simply cancel the split bolus.

What do we do now? You're in need of a split bolus on top of a split bolus.


When Do We Need to Use a Split on a Split?

Anytime your child eats more than the first serving of combo-worthy carbs (low-GI, high-protein, or high-fat foods).


How Do We Add a Split Bolus to an Existing Split Bolus?

Since the pump will not allow you to directly layer a Split Bolus on top of an existing Split Bolus, we need to think outside the box. There are two methods that our families have used for dealing with this situation.

Method 1: Delay Activating the Extended Portion of the Bolus Until the End of the Meal

If you are not sure how much pizza, pasta, or rice and beans your child with diabetes will eat, you can:
  • Start with the smallest serving that you are confident your child will eat (while still anticipating that she will likely eat a second serving or more).
For example, if you're pretty sure she will eat one slice of pizza, but think she may eat two or three, start with a one-slice serving.
  • Next, have the pump calculate what the insulin dose would be for that first, small serving. Using the Split Bolus function (see above for manufacturer-specific feature names) within the Carb Bolus Calculator, have the pump calculate the amount of each portion of the split bolus.
Let's say that the pump bolus calculator recommends 3.0U total insulin to cover the carbs in that one slice of pizza. If you enter a 60/40 split, that would mean 1.8U as the normal (upfront) portion of the bolus, and 1.2U as the extended portion of the bolus.
  • Go ahead and deliver ONLY the Normal portion of what will be a split bolus. You may prefer to back out of the split bolus function to do so, and simply use the Carb Calculator function, or even the Normal Bolus function.
For example, using the same 60/40 split as above, you would deliver 1.8U of insulin , as a normal bolus, for that first slice of pizza.
  • Make note of the as-yet-undelivered Extended portion.
In this example, the remaining insulin to be delivered as an extended bolus is 1.2U.
  • If your child decides that she's done after that one slice, you can go ahead and deliver the Extended Bolus for that slice (as described in step 8), OR
  • If she wants more pizza, repeat steps 2 - 4 for each additional serving.
If your child has a second and then a third slice of pizza, you would, for example (assuming for simplicity that the slices are all identical in carb content), deliver 1.8U (upfront) for the second slice, and then 1.8U (again, upfront) for the third. Both of these amounts would represent 60% of the total carbs needed to cover each slice, and would leave 1.2U and 1.2U still to be delivered.
  • Once your child has finished the meal, add up the amounts of the Extended portions still to be delivered.
For example, 1.2 + 1.2 + 1.2 = 3.6U
  • Deliver that amount as an Extended Bolus, with zero units up front, and with the total extended over your chosen time period.
For the example of 3 slices of pizza, 3.6U would be delivered as a (0:100) 100% Extended Bolus over the next chosen number of hours.

For the example of 1 slice of pizza (if you skipped here from step 5), 1.2U would be delivered as a (0:100) 100% Extended Bolus over the next chosen number of hours.

This method works great if you anticipated the extra servings. But what if you thought, "there's no way she'll eat more than 1 slice" and already activated the extended portion of the combo bolus, some of it was delivered and THEN she asked for a second serving? Now you need Method 2...


Method 2:

If your child's request for extra servings of a combo-worthy food took you by surprise, you can:
  • Cancel the remaining extended portion of the bolus, making sure to first note the amount of this extended portion that has yet to be delivered. These figures can be obtained on the Split Bolus Cancel screen while cancelling, through the pump status screens before cancelling, or through the pump history after cancelling.
For example, the history may show that 0.3U were delivered out of 1.2U, leaving 0.9U still to be delivered in the extended portion of the bolus.
  • Deliver the normal bolus portion of insulin for the second serving (and third, or fourth, as needed) as outlined in steps 2-4 in Method 1 above, making note of the additional extended boluses that still need to be delivered.
Using the same second and third example slices from the Method 1 example above, you would deliver 1.8U and then 1.8U (both upfront), leaving 1.2U and 1.2U still to be delivered.
  • Once your child has finished the meal, add up the amounts of the Extended portions still to be delivered.
For example, 0.9 + 1.2 + 1.2 = 3.3U
  • Deliver that amount as an Extended Bolus, with zero units up front, and the total extended over your chosen time period.
For example, 3.3U would be delivered as a 0:100 Extended Bolus over the next chosen number of hours.


For additional strategies regarding Combo Bolus, you may want to check out Waltzing the Dragon's article: Tweaking a Split Bolus.



Have your own strategies for dealing with the Split Bolus? Any questions? Comments? Feel free to Contact Us.



The above information was reviewed for content accuracy by clinical staff of the Alberta Children’s Hospital Diabetes Clinic.

This material has been developed from sources that we believe are accurate, however, as the field of medicine (in particular as it applies to diabetes) is rapidly evolving, the information should not be relied upon, as it is designed for informational purposes only. It should not be used in place of medical advice, instruction and/or treatment. If you have specific questions, please consult your doctor or appropriate health care professional.

Back to Top

Website Builder